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Chimacum Middle School

Simple Machines Webquest
Chimacum Middle School

Created by Al González
Chimacum, WA
Last updated on Tuesday, July 21, 2015


Intro || Task || Process || Resources || Evaluation || Conclusion


Introduction: Congratulations, your class has been selected to create an exhibit on the six simple machines for the British Museum of History in London, England. There will be six rooms and your task is to create a room for each of the six simple machines and present your ideas to the board of directors as to what you want to include in your room. The purpose of this exhibit is to teach those that visit about your specific simple machine, its history (when and where it was invented and how it was used), and how your simple machine makes work easier.

Simple Machines Graphic with all six
                                                          machines.
Picture used with permission from The Franklin Institute Resources for Science Learning.
Google Maps image of British Museum in
                                                        London.
Google Maps image of the entrance to the British Museum in London.

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Your Task: Your task is to create a PowerPoint presentation (or if you don't have PowerPoint - iPad and Netbooks) create a Google Presentation (it's a lot like a PowerPoint) for the board of directors displaying the following five points:

  1. Describe when each machine was first invented or used.
  2. Include anyone who is credited with each machine's invention or first use.
  3. Describe the use of each machine through history.
  4. Include specific examples on how each machine makes work easier.
  5. And finally, design an exhibit to share what you've learned with visitors of the British Museum.

 

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Process:

Step 1: As a team research all six simple machines and their history. Make sure you read through all the websites in the Resources section. Find information about each simple machine, each simple machine's history including who is credited with its invention or use, and how your simple machine makes work easier.

Divide the labor so you aren't all taking the same notes. One person could do three machines and the other person could do the other three (two machines each in a team of three). Just make sure you are ALL researching and taking notes.

Step 2:
Next, use this blank timeline sheet to take notes on the history of each machine. (Here's a copy for Wordpad for the Netbook - an rtf file.) Recreate the timeline on Word, or Wordpad, or Office2 HD to include dates and what happened at each date with each simple machine like when it was first used, what it was used for, who made it famous, etc.

Use this sheet for taking notes on all six simple machines. (Here's a copy for Wordpad for the Netbook - an rtf file.)

Read about summarizing vs paraphrasing to help you take notes. (Use the Back button on the top left to return to this page.)

Step 3:
Once you are done taking notes you will create a PowerPoint presentation or a Google Doc Presentation (or some other kind of presentation) working together using all your different notes. The presentation will be viewed by the museum board of directors. After viewing all the proposals, the board will choose the winning idea for their exhibit.

Along with a title slide and closing slide, your PowerPoint will include slides detailing the history of each simple machine, how each simple machine is used, and your plan for the museum exhibit. Include a list of artifacts needed for your exhibit.

Step 4:
When your PowerPoint is complete go to the Evaluation section of this webquest and score yourselves on how well you conducted the research, score your PowerPoint and finally score how you each individually contributed to getting this project done. Write down each category in your notebook and by each category write down the number score you are giving yourself. Then add them up and write down your totals in your notebook.

 

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Resources:

Kidipede Machines
(Click on the links to learn about each machine and its history.)
Simple Machines (with examples)
An Overview of Simple Machines
Thanks to Jackie Forsyth and Marcus!
Simple Machines and the Physics of Cars
Thanks to Alex from Teen Car Talk
Simple Machines Lesson Plans Science Trek - Simple Machines: Facts
An Invention Learning Center for Young Merchants, Entrepreneurs and Inventors!
Thanks to Ms. Hayes and her Afterskoolkids.org for the link!

Simple Machines in Appliances, Gadgets, and Everyday Life - Sorry, this link went dead!

Thanks to Ms. Cromwell for the link!

Simple Machines and Motor Lessons for Students

Thanks to Patrick and his Tech Class!

Tools and Simple Machines!

Simple Machine Facts

 


You can also use the Energy, Machines, and Motion textbook
(if you have the 2000 edition, go to lesson 11, p. 106, lesson 12 p. 116,
lesson 13, p. 125, and lesson 14, p. 135.).

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Evaluation:

Rubric:Use the following rubrics to score your final product. Here is a research rubric.

CATEGORY

Excellent

4

Good

3

Needs Improvement

2

Poor

1

ClearNotes
Notes are recorded and organized in an extremely neat and orderly fashion.
Notes are recorded legibly and are somewhat organized.
Notes are recorded.
Notes are recorded only with peer/teacher assistance and reminders.
ClearInternet Use
Successfully uses suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance.
Usually able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance.
Occasionally able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance.
Needs assistance or supervision to use suggested internet links and/or to navigate within these sites.
ClearQuality of Information
Information clearly relates to the main topic. It includes several supporting details and/or examples.
Information clearly relates to the main topic. It provides 1-2 supporting details and/or examples.
Information clearly relates to the main topic. No details and/or examples are given.
Information has little or nothing to do with the main topic.
ClearAmount of Information
All topics are addressed and all questions answered with at least 2 sentences about each.
All topics are addressed and most questions answered with at least 2 sentences about each.
All topics are addressed, and most questions answered with 1 sentence about each.
One or more topics were not addressed.
ClearOrganization
Information is very organized with well-constructed paragraphs and subheadings.
Information is organized with well-constructed paragraphs.
Information is organized, but paragraphs are not well-constructed.
The information is disorganized.

18 to 20 = Excellent researching, 14 to 17 = Good researching, 12 to 13  = Your research needs work, 11 or less = You need to redo your research

PowerPoint Rubric (Use the Back button on the top left to return to this page.)

 

SELF EVALUATION:
Answer the following questions:
    •How did you use your class time? Briefly describe your daily activities.
    •How did you work with your team?
        •Did you share information and responsibilities?
        •Describe how you broke up the responsibilities.
    •If you were to do this same project again, what would you do differently? What would make this a more meaningful activity for you?

Rate yourself on the following Teamwork Skills rubric.

CATEGORY

Excellent

4

Good

3

Needs Improvement

2

Poor

1

ClearContributions
Routinely provides useful ideas when participating in the group and in classroom discussion. A definite leader who contributes a lot of effort.
Usually provides useful ideas when participating in the group and in classroom discussion. A strong group member who tries hard!
Sometimes provides useful ideas when participating in the group and in classroom discussion. A satisfactory group member who does what is required.
Rarely provides useful ideas when participating in the group and in classroom discussion. May refuse to participate.
ClearQuality of Work
Provides work of the highest quality.
Provides high quality work.
Provides work that occasionally needs to be checked/redone by other group members to ensure quality.
Provides work that usually needs to be checked/redone by others to ensure quality.
ClearTime-management
Routinely uses time well throughout the project to ensure things get done on time. Group does not have to adjust deadlines or work responsibilities because of this person's procrastination.
Usually uses time well throughout the project, but may have procrastinated on one thing. Group does not have to adjust deadlines or work responsibilities because of this person's procrastination.
Tends to procrastinate, but always gets things done by the deadlines. Group does not have to adjust deadlines or work responsibilities because of this person's procrastination.
Rarely gets things done by the deadlines AND group has to adjust deadlines or work responsibilities because of this person's inadequate time management.
ClearWorking with Others
Almost always listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Tries to keep people working well together.
Usually listens to, shares, with, and supports the efforts of others. Does not cause "waves" in the group.
Often listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others, but sometimes is not a good team member.
Rarely listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Often is not a good team player.
ClearMonitors Group Effectiveness
Routinely monitors the effectiveness of the group, and makes suggestions to make it more effective.
Routinely monitors the effectiveness of the group and works to make the group more effective.
Occasionally monitors the effectiveness of the group and works to make the group more effective.
Rarely monitors the effectiveness of the group and does not work to make it more effective.

18 to 20 = Excellent team member, 14 to 17 = Good team member, 12 to 13  = You need to work on being a better team member, 11 or less = You are a poor team member

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Conclusion: Thank you for offering your ideas to the board of directors for a British Museum of History exhibit on simple machines and their history. You helped add to the museum's legacy of expanding our knowledge by learning from the past. Many tourists and visitors to the museum will benefit from your work as they learn more about the physics, history and use of simple machines. Your exhibit might help inspire the next great inventor!

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